Why More Women Are Choosing to Become CNC Machinists

Why More Women Are Choosing to Become CNC Machinists

Mold masher tools

Rosey the Riveter would be proud of modern women today.

The cultural icon representing American women working in factories during World War II is symbolic of feminism and the economic power of women in the workforce; particularly in machining and fabrication positions. During WWII, women took to working in factories in order to replace male workers who were deployed.

While women were expected to return to their roles as homemakers post-war, women made a named for themselves in the machining, fabrication, and metal working industries and proved they could skillfully use equipment such as precision cutting tools, mill cutters, and aluminum cutters. After the war, the efforts of women working in factories was not forgotten. Americans were impressed by the craftsmanship of their work, as well as their dedication. Though few women remained in the field after the war, this marked the beginning of women entering the machining industry.

Fast forward to modern times, and women have created a strong presence in the machining industry, especially with continued technological advances, such as the advent of mold masher tools in 1984. Mold masher tools were pivotal in launching ball end mill technology. The role of mold masher tools has been both to utilize and and extend the advantages of CNC generated tool paths which are now used extensively in the metal working industry.

Now, unlike past generations past, the role of women in the machining, fabricating, and metal working industries is a prominent one, with more and more women opting to choose career paths in these industries. In fact, there are several nationwide initiatives and campaigns dedicated to encouraging women to choose career paths in the metal working industry.

The American dream, especially gender roles have been completely redefined as the dynamics of American society continue to change. As a whole, society is far progressive than previous; it’s no longer shocking or controversial for a woman to work as a machinist. If anything, it’s encouraged and celebrated.

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