Is It TIme for You to Clean Out the Closets and Drawers in Your House?

Is It TIme for You to Clean Out the Closets and Drawers in Your House?

Charitable clothing donations

Your kids have three more days at home before they return to school. At the end of some long day celebrating Christmas and New Year’s with relatives and friends, you might be wondering what you are going to do to keep everyone busy, but make progress around the house as well. If you are looking for ways to keep your children not only busy, but productive as well, consider an alphabetical challenge that can help you clean out your house as well as help others less fortunate. Challenge your children to donate clothes, toys, books, and other household items to local charity organizations. Maybe you can achieve the alphabet challenge as a family, or if you are up for even more of a challenge, individually. Here are some ideas to help you get started:

  • Appliances that are sitting around the house unused can serve as great donations for veterans whose families are trying to get themselves back on track.
  • Baby clothes that you are no longer using can make a big difference to a single mother who is struggling to provide for her new child.
  • Chairs, tables, and other household furniture items are great contributions to families who have had to move unexpectedly and did not get to bring their items along.
  • Dressers, cabinets, as well as clothing items are important organizational items that many families in need lack.
  • Even worn and torn clothing that is donated can help us keep more items out of landfills. Currently, textiles account for 5% of municipal waste in this country because only about 15% of them are recycled.
  • Food items can also help families in need. In addition to the decision to find an alphabetical list of items so that you can donate clothes, maybe your family can help you locate food items that as well.
  • Girls winter coats are in big need as the cold temperatures of winter approach.
  • Hats, gloves, mittens, and other cold weather accessories also make great items to add to your donate clothes pile.
  • Ice cream scoops and other kitchen items make great donations..
  • Jello molds, cake pans, and other items are also needed by many families.
  • Kids shoes, kids coats, and other kids items are always needed.
  • Lace table cloths, linen napkins, and other table items can help families make the most of their new location, even if it is temporary.
  • Mountain boots, hiking boots, and other outdoor footwear that has been outgrown can be used by children in need.
  • Nice clothes that you no longer wear can be the perfect thing for someone who is getting ready for the first days at a new job.
  • Overcoats and suits for men are always welcome clothing donations. In addition to helping someone who needs it get something nice to wear from a job interview, these items are also worth approximately $60 as a tax write-off.
  • Purses, backpacks, and other personal storage items can be put to great use by people who find themselves living in temporary shelters and looking for a way to securely keep their personal items.
  • Quilts, blankets, towels, and other items that are just cluttering up your hallway closet can be put to use in animal shelters around the country.
  • Red was the color you had to wear every Friday at your first teaching job. Now you have a whole closet full of red clothes you never wear that should be put in the donate clothes pile.
  • Sweaters are a warm clothing donation that are very much needed.
  • Textiles that are recycled rather than thrown into landfills create an entire industry of jobs.
  • Unused and unworn underwear, socks, and other personal items help people stay clean and healthy.
  • Very soft blankets are always welcome.
  • Watering cans, shovels, hoses, and other outdoor tools.
  • X-tra love and care go with the clothing that is donated.
  • Yarn, knitting needles, crochet hooks, and other hand crafts can help older residents in nursing home reconnect with tasks they enjoyed when they were younger.
  • Zippers, buttons, fabric, and other sewing supplies can serve a new purpose with a mother that knows how to make clothing for her children.

Currently, Americans only recycle or donate 15% of their used clothing. Maybe your alphabet search can help you increase the odds!
See this link for more.


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